Department of English

Resources / Course Descriptions

Descriptions of courses offered by the Department of English are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

English Education (ENED)

  • ENED 4000 - Service Learning in English Education

    • A community activity which links learning to life by connecting meaningful community service activities with academic learning, personal growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be designed with the instructor and approved by the chair/program director.
    • Prerequisites: 60 hours and permission of instructor and department chair/program director.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • ENED 4414 - Teaching of English Language Arts I

    • This course addresses the practical application of English Language Arts curricula, learning theories, teaching strategies, instructional materials, and assessment choices within specific teaching contexts. The course emphasizes justifying teaching decisions based on clear rationales anchored in practice, theory, and research; refining the facilitation of high levels of learning in all students through effective practices; and adjusting teaching moves based on evidence, such as classroom self-observation, student response and performance, and student products.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 3241, ENGL 3310, ENGL 3391, and admission to the English Education program and Yearlong Clinical Experience
    • Corequisites: ENED 4650
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENED 4415 - Teaching of English/Language Arts (6-12) Internship

    • Secondary school field experience in English/Language Arts teaching with concurrent seminars. Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to school placement.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to ENED 4414.
    • Corequisites: ENED 4415.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENED 4475 - Student Teaching: English (6-12)

    • Full-time teaching experience in English under the supervision of a secondary school cooperating teacher and a college English education supervisor. Includes regularly scheduled seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required prior to school placement.
    • Prerequisites: ENED 4414, ENED 4415, and approval of Field Experience Application.
    • Credits: 12 Credit Hours
  • ENED 4498 - Internship in Teaching English

    • Student teaching experience in English for provisionally certified teachers. Supervision will be in collaboration with a mentor-teacher in the local school and a university English education supervisor. When taken for 12 hours of credit at the same school, this internship will automatically substitute for ENED 4475. Proof of professional liability insurance is required. Students are responsible for their own school placements.
    • Prerequisites: Provisional teaching license issued by State of Georgia, full-time employment teaching English.
    • Credits: 0-18-12

English (ENGL)

  • ENGL 0020 - Principles of Writing for the Regents' Test

    • Instruction and review for the Regents’ Test with emphasis on principles and patterns of academic writing.

      Note: Required of students who have failed the essay portion of the test.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Credits: 3-0-0
  • ENGL 0099 - Writing for Academic Purposes

    • A Learning Support Programs course that prepares students for credit courses in English. Emphasizes principles of good writing, particularly in clear and logically written essays.
    • Prerequisites: Placement by COMPASS Examination by the Admissions Office, or by the Department of Learning Support Programs.
    • Credits: 3-0-0
  • ENGL 0999 - Support for English Composition (ENGL 1101)

    • This course provides corequisite skills and additional instruction for topics and concepts covered in ENGL 1101 Composition I.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Corequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 1101 - Composition I

    • Focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation. Also includes introductory use of a variety of research skills.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if required
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 1102 - Composition II

    • Develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Interpretation and evaluation are emphasized, and a variety of more advanced research methods are incorporated.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 (with C or better)
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2110 - World Literature

    • A study of world literature that explores human experience by examining diverse aesthetic and cultural perspectives from ancient to modern times.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 (with C or better)
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2111 - Early World Literature

    • This course is a survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2112 - World Literature mid 1600s to Present

    • This course is a survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2120 - British Literature

    • This course is a survey of important works of British literature.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2121 - Early British Literature

    • This course is a survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the neoclassical age.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2122 - British Literature late 1700s to Present

    • This course is a survey of important works of British literature from the Romantic era to the present.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2130 - American Literature

    • This course is a survey of important works of American literature.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2131 - Early American Literature

    • This course is a survey of American literature from the pre-colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2132 - American Literature mid 1800s to Present

    • This course is a survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2145 - Introduction to English Studies

    • This course introduces students to the reading, writing, research, and critical strategies essential to KSU English Studies. The course draws connections among the four content areas in the English Department (Literature, Language, Writing, and Theory) and focuses on their relationship to broader social and personal contexts, enabling students to make informed choices about their program of study and their careers.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2160 - American Literature Survey

    • This survey of American literature from its beginnings to the present introduces English and Secondary English Education majors to the historical periods and major trends and figures of American literature.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2172 - British Literature, Beginnings to 1660

    • This survey of British literature from its beginnings to 1660 introduces English and Secondary English Education majors to the historical periods and major trends and figures of British literature.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2174 - British Literature, 1660 to Present

    • This survey of British literature from 1660 to the present introduces English and Secondary English Education majors to the historical periods and major trends and figures of British literature.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2271 - Introduction to Teaching English Language Arts

    • This course provides an introduction to teaching English Language Arts (grades 6-12). Through the study of theory and practice, context-based models, and specific applications, students explore the potential of the English Language Arts classroom and investigate the professional roles, relationships, and responsibilities of the English Language Arts teacher. This course is a prerequisite for all other English Education courses and mandatory for admittance to the English Education program.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 2300 - African-American Literature

    • This course is a survey of important works of African-American literature.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3030 - Studies in Grammar and Linguistics

    •  

      This course is a study of the theories and methods of linguistics, including their application to topics such as language acquisition, sociolinguistics, politics, discourse analysis, advanced grammar, or the historical development of English.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3035 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics

    •  

      This course analyzes the nature of human language. It includes an introduction to speech sounds, morphology, and syntax. A heavy emphasis is placed on the social and pedagogical implications of modern linguistic theory, which includes an examination of issues such as Standard English, dialect variation, language acquisition, or English as a Second Language.

      Notes: Offered as an online course.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3040 - History of the English Language

    •  

      This course is a study of the development of English, with attention to influential historical events and to the evolving structure of the language.

      Notes: The influence of dialect and other factors on American English may be included.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3230 - Literary Genre

    • This course is a study of the development and history of a particular literary form, such as narrative, poetry, or drama, through the exploration of representative works. Particular attention is given to the evolution of new strategies for the creation and reception of the genre and to the aesthetic, historical, and cultural conditions that shape those strategies.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3232 - Topics in Drama

    • This course is a study of selected topics, authors, or periods of dramatic literature. The course also addresses the fundamental literary generic characteristics of dramatic form, including plot, character, action, and setting, as well as the conventions of dramatic genres, such as tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, closet, and narrative drama.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3241 - Technology and Digital Media in English/Language Arts

    • This course provides students with experience in the ways that digital media and technology can be used meaningfully in the English/Language Arts classroom. Students consider, experiment with, and apply specific technologies in order to develop comfort with and control over these tools. The course prepares students to develop adolescents’ literacy practices with technology in the English/Language Arts classroom.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2271 and admission into the English Education program
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3310 - Principles of Writing Instruction

    • This course provides an exploration of theories of composition pedagogy and assessment, including a variety of strategies for teaching writing while dealing with institutional policies such as standardized testing. Students practice oral and written communication for various audiences and purposes; create, implement, and assess writing instruction in a middle school setting; and create and practice research-supported approaches to grammar instruction. The course includes a 45-hour embedded field experience in a middle school.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2271 and admission into the English Education or Secondary and Middle Grades Language Arts program
    • Credits: 6-0-6
  • ENGL 3320 - Scriptural Literature

    •  

      This course is a study of authors, themes, genres, and composition of scriptural writings.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3322 - Hebrew Scriptures as Literature

    • This course is a study of the Hebrew Scriptures of the Bible, known to Christians as the Old Testament, as literature, concerning its aesthetic value with respect to authors, themes, genres, and composition within the context of its original Hebrew and Jewish audiences. Students improve and refine their abilities to read, think, write, and speak critically and cogently about scriptural literature and have an increased familiarity with much of the Hebrew Bible. Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3324 - New Testament as Literature

    • This course is a study of the New Testament of the Bible as literature, concerning its aesthetic value with respect to authors, themes, genres, and composition within the context of its original Mediterranean audiences. Students improve and refine their abilities to read, think, write, and speak critically and cogently about scriptural literature and have an increased familiarity with much of the New Testament.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3330 - Gender Studies

    •  

      This course is a study of literature using gender as the primary category of analysis. Viewing gender as a social construction, it explores such issues as gendered roles in society, interactions between private and public life, gender’s relation to canon formation, and individuals’ struggle to define their place in culture in the face of gendered expectations. It may focus on a region or nation, a time period, a theme, a representative individual, or some combination.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3340 - Ethnic Literature

    • A study of literature using ethnicity as the primary category of analysis. Individual offerings of the course might survey a range of ethnic literature (e.g., Asian American, Chicano, Native American, Jewish) or explore one such body of texts (e.g., Caribbean literature).

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3350 - Regional Literature

    • A study of literature using region as the primary category of analysis. Texts might include fiction and nonfiction, performance texts (such as drama and folktales from the oral tradition), and examples of material culture (e.g., architecture, home furnishings, and clothing). The class might focus on a specific geographic region (e.g., the American South, the Caribbean); a comparative study of regional culture (Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpa vs. Hardy’s Wessex, Hawthorne’s and Melville’s New England vs. Sedgwick’s and Jewett’s New England); or authors or themes closely associated with a region (e.g., Cather’s West, Race and Religion in the South).

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3360 - Major African American Writers

    • Development of African American literature with emphasis on major writers defining trends, movements, genres, and themes.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3390 - Great Works for Middle Grades Teachers

    •  

      This course is a survey of classic literature written by diverse authors. It focuses on text analysis and writing about literature. The texts studied are frequently found in the middle grades classroom.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3391 - Teaching Literature to Adolescents

    • Using narrative as a central genre, this course introduces current English teaching philosophy and practice in teaching literature to adolescents. This course models current ways to integrate technology into the curriculum, identifies a variety of multicultural teaching texts, and extends the study of critical theory into the teaching of literature to adolescents.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2271 and admission into the English Education program
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3396 - Cooperative Study

    • A supervised work experience program for a minimum of two semesters at a site in business, industry or government. For sophomore, junior, or senior-level students who wish to obtain on-he-job experience in conjunction with their academic training.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of coordinator of cooperative education/internships (Career Services).
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • ENGL 3398 - Internship

    • Supervised, credit-earning work experience of one semester with a previously approved business firm, private agency, or government agency.

       

    • Prerequisites: Approval of departmental internship adviser.
    • Credits: 1-12 Credit Hours
  • ENGL 3400 - Survey of African Literatures

    • This course is a survey of African literatures, including the orature, literature, performance texts, film and/or other media produced in each quadrant of Africa, from early times to the present day. For example, the course might survey African narrative, looking at a selection of early epics, folktales, short stories or novels representing themes, motifs, and styles in each quadrant of Africa.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3500 - Topics in African American Literature

    • This course is a study of a selected topic of African-American literature. For example, the course might focus on a single artist (such as Ralph Ellison), a group of artists (such as writers of the Harlem Renaissance), a genre (such as the slave narrative), a source or technique (such as folklore in twentieth century novels), or a theme or issue (such as depictions of women, the oral-musical tradition or humor and signifying).

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 3600 - Topics in African Diaspora Literatures

    • This course is a study of a selected topic in the areas of the African Diaspora. For example, the course might focus on a single author or group of authors: “The Novels of Paule Marshall”; a country or region: “Caribbean Literatures”; a movement or an event: “Post-Colonial Caribbean Literatures”; a theme or issue: “Twentieth-Century Caribbean Women Writers”; a genre: “African, African American and Afro-Caribbean Autobiography”; or a combination of these or other categories.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4220 - Critical Theory

    • An advanced course in interpretive theoretical paradigms as applied to the study of literature and culture, focusing on critical models such as Marxism, Structuralism, Poststructuralism, Deconstruction, Psychoanalytic criticism, and Gender, Ethnic, and Cultural studies.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4230 - Theory-Based Studies in Literature

    • Concentration on the interpretive strategies and conceptual framework of one of the major paradigms of contemporary literary theory, with attention to the ways in which those paradigms enable the study of a select group of texts, both literary and nonliterary. Topics may include Feminist theory, Marxism, Post-Colonialism, Psychoanalytic Criticism, Cultural Materialism, Ethnic studies, Gender studies, New-Historicism, and Reader Response theories.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4240 - Rhetorical Theory

    • This advanced course is a study of major texts in rhetorical theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the significant issues in rhetoric, especially the relationship of language to truth and knowledge. Students gain practice in using rhetorical concepts to analyze both literary and non-literary texts and to produce effective written and spoken arguments.
    • Prerequisites: “C” or better grade in an ENGL 2000-level class, a WRIT 3000 class, a TCOM 2000-level class, or a DWMA 2000-level class
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4340 - Shakespeare

    • This course is a study of selected comedies, histories, and tragedies, covering the range of Shakespeare’s dramatic art. It may include dramatic form and poetic composition as commentaries on the dramatic genres and an examination of performance theory and practice.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4360 - American Literature Before 1800

    • Literary studies of colonial and early United States literature. Prior to 1800 in the Americas, complex and diverse encounters of Old and New World cultures resulted in the Constitution of the United States of America and the emergence of its wide range of literatures.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4370 - British Medieval and Chaucerian Literature

    • Studies in Middle English literature, including Chaucer. May include prose, poetry, and drama and investigate aesthetic, intellectual, and social issues.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4372 - British Renaissance Literature

    • British literature from the late fifteenth century to 1660, generally exclusive of Shakespeare. May include poetry, prose, and drama and investigate aesthetic, intellectual, and social issues.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4374 - Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature

    • British literature from 1660 to the late eighteenth century. May include poetry, prose, and drama and investigate aesthetic, intellectual, and social issues.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4380 - World Literature Before 1800

    • A study of representative texts, major themes, or literary movements of the period, emphasizing aesthetic and social understanding. The course may examine Western and non-Western cultures.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4400 - Directed Study

    • Selected topics of an advanced nature that may include original research for superior students. Normally for projects not served through pre-established curriculum.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor, curriculum committee, and department chair required prior to registration.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • ENGL 4401 - Topics in African Literatures

    • This course is a study of a selected topic in the areas of orature, literature, performance texts, film and/or other media produced in Africa. The course might focus on an author or group of authors: “The Plays of Wole Soyinka”; a region or country: “Twentieth Century South African Literature”; a movement or event: “African Writers of the Negritude Movement”; a theme or issue: “Women’s Rights in African Literature”; or a combination of these categories.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4460 - 19th-Century American Literature

    •  

      A study of representative writers in American literature in the nineteenth century.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

      Offered as an online course.

       

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4470 - 19th-Century British Literature

    • Studies in Romantic and Victorian literature, from the 1780s to the end of the nineteenth century, examining such aesthetic and social themes as the nature and role of the artist, the impulse toward gothicism, the rise of the autobiography, responses to industrialization, and the conflict between tradition and change, as these are expressed in representative texts of the period.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4480 - 19th-Century World Literature

    • A study of representative texts, major themes, or literary movements of the nineteenth century, emphasizing aesthetic and social understanding. The course may examine Western and non-Western cultures.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

      Offered as an online course. 

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4490 - Special Topics in English

    • A study of selected topics of special interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2110
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4560 - 20th-Century American Literature

    • A study of representative texts, major themes, or literary movements in twentieth-century America, emphasizing aesthetic and social understanding.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4570 - 20th-Century British Literature

    • A study of representative twentieth-century British literature.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4580 - 20th-Century World Literature

    • A study of representative texts, major themes, or literary movements of twentieth-century literature, emphasizing aesthetic and social understanding.

      Note: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2145
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 4620 - Senior Seminar

    • Detailed study of a literary, artistic, or cultural movement, theme, trend, or philosophy with literary texts as the focal point but exploring works in related fields, culminating in the preparation of an original, substantial, and researched seminar paper, which is to be presented orally and formally. The course will be open to English and other majors.

       

    • Prerequisites: Completion of 90 hours.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7701 - Topics in Literature

    • A treatment of themes and issues in English and/or American and/or World literature. Students will read selected works and consider teaching applications for engaging adolescents and young adults in responding to and interpreting a wide variety of literary texts.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7709 - Workshop for Teachers of Writing

    • An experiential examination of principles and issues in the teaching of writing, K-20. Along with reflective exploration of current theories of composition and extensive writing, this course includes the following topics: literacy acquisition and language development, especially through writing; building writing communities; the teacher as writer; the place of publication in the writing process; and assessment of writing.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7710 - Writing on Teaching

    • A collaborative workshop for educators preparing to write about teaching. Students in the course will develop individual writing projects for submission to venues publishing such genres as teacher research, curriculum development stories, experienced-based writing about classrooms, and scholarship of teaching.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education, and teaching experience and graduate coursework in educational research or writing.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7711 - Multicultural Literature in English

    • An examination of multicultural literature written in English. Genres studied include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and nontraditional literary texts (e.g., film, oral performance). Students will explore primary and secondary sources to use for teaching literature from a global perspective, including studying how emerging traditions of literary criticism and theory can shape interpretations and teaching.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7721 - Author Studies

    • A study of the work of one or more significant authors. Attention will be given to strategies for engaging students in critical thinking and writing about literature.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7731 - Language Studies in English

    • A study of language as a key component of English/Language Arts. Topics include understanding English’s historical and ongoing development, learning English as a second language, using discourse appropriately in a variety of contexts, dialect variations, relationships between oral and written language use, and issues involved in teaching language (e.g., teaching grammar in context).
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7735 - Introduction to Composition Studies

    • A survey of issues and themes in composition studies, especially those which have influenced writing instruction in the schools. Topics examined include writing as a process and writing for a variety of purposes, audiences, and genres, as well as approaches for evaluating writing and for planning writing instruction that invites students to use the art of writing for exploring authentic issues that matter in their lives.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7741 - Technology and Media in English and Language Arts

    • Focus on the current effects and potential of technology and multimedia in writing, reading and literature instruction. Students explore ways technology is changing reading and writing processes in school, the workplace and in daily life and develop effective ways of integrating technology into instructional programs.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7750 - English Studies in the Schools

    • Review of the field of English Studies today, including relationships among concepts that guide the field, especially in schools. Students will explore strategies for integrating various elements of English Studies (including writing, reading/literature, language, and literacy studies) in scholarship and in teaching. Topics will include standards and assessment in English/Language Arts, especially those associated with National Board Certification and the National Council of Teachers of English standards for instruction.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7900 - Special Topics

    • Exploration of a specifically designed topic in an advanced-level seminar with extensive reading, writing and presenting assignments.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education and permission of advisor, instructor, department chair, and director, graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ENGL 7950 - Directed Study

    • Detailed, advanced-level examination of a topic selected and shaped collaboratively by the instructor and the student submitting a proposal for the special course. This course is not an individually scheduled offering of a regular course, but a unique study designed by the student to address individual needs and interests.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education and permission of advisor, instructor, department chair, and director, graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Film (FILM)

  • FILM 3105 - Fundamentals of Writing for Film and Television

    • This is a professional seminar for anyone interested in learning about and/or breaking into the entertainment industry - specifically focusing on film and television. Hollywood blockbusters and great television shows are studied from a story structure perspective. Students learn how to develop, pitch, write, and sell commercial film and TV concepts/scripts; they examine film and TV production jobs, including how to get one in Georgia. This is essential training for screenwriters, novelists, directors, and executives.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • FILM 3200 - Film History and Theory I

    • A survey of the major developments, movements, and critical approaches in international cinema from 1895-1950, this course emphasizes an understanding of the historical, cultural, commercial, and aesthetic contexts that influence film. The course also develops the student’s understanding of a film’s narrative and visual structure and its place within established theoretical traditions.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • FILM 3210 - Film History and Theory II

    • This course is a survey of the major developments, movements, and critical approaches in international cinema since 1950, including a consideration of American independent film and recent digital cinema. The course emphasizes an understanding of the historical, cultural, commercial, and aesthetic contexts that influence film, but also develops the student’s understanding of a film’s narrative and visual structure and its place within established theoretical traditions.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • FILM 3220 - Studies in Film

    • This course features the analysis of film from such perspectives as genre, literary and film aesthetics, and literary adaptation. It may include screening of selected films.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • FILM 4105 - Advanced Writing for Film and Television

    • Using the basic skills gained in the fundamentals course (FILM 3105), students will now expand beyond mastery of the scene and write an entire film or television script over the course of the semester. This is an intensive writing course. Along with a strong desire to write professionally, independence, discipline and collegiality are requisites for success in this course. Students must come to class prepared with at least one story idea for an original full-length movie, pilot TV series, or speculative episode of a TV series in mind. Students will be divided into groups, based loosely on genre. In addition to their work in class, students will also work with each other out of class. Students will complete the class with an original script, advanced knowledge of the screen and television writing crafts, and experience in the professional collaborative process.
    • Prerequisites: FILM 3105
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • FILM 4200 - Advanced Studies in Film

    • An intensive study of selected topics in American and international cinema, emphasizing critical theory and analysis of films and related readings.

      Notes: This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: FILM 3200 or FILM 3220, or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Writing (WRIT)

  • WRIT 3000 - Introduction to Creative Writing Genres

    • This course is a multi-genre creative writing survey incorporating the study of three genres from the following list: short fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, playwriting, and screenplay writing. Pairing creativity with technique, this content-based course introduces students to concepts, approaches, and methods. As students develop a portfolio of work, they learn to contextualize their own writing with writings from celebrated authors by completing short critical commentaries. This course introduces students to the workshop format.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3100 - Poetry Writing

    • This course is a workshop approach to poetry writing that emphasizes original writing, revision, and analysis and response from classmates. Some attention is given to the work of established writers as models.

      Notes: Offered as an online course.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3109 - Careers in Writing

    • This course exposes students from a variety of backgrounds to various careers in writing. (Students need not be English majors.) Students will analyze and create a wide variety of professional texts ranging from technical, business, and governmental documents to medical, community-based, and web-based documents.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3110 - Playwriting

    •  

      This course is a workshop approach to playwriting that emphasizes original writing, revision, and analysis and response from classmates. Some attention is given to the work of established writers as models.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3111 - Professional Editing

    • This is a course in editing as a practice and a profession. It focuses on editorial roles and responsibilities and introduces students to the skills, principles, and methods of editing. Course assignments provide ample practice in applying the techniques of editing, including editing for grammar, punctuation, and style. This course prepares students for careers in publishing and writing.

      Notes: Offered as an online course.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3120 - Fiction Writing

    • This course is a workshop approach to fiction writing that emphasizes original writing, revision, and analysis and response from classmates. Some attention is given to the work of established writers as models.

      Notes: Offered as an online course.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3130 - Literary Nonfiction

    •  

      This course is a study and practice of selected genres of literary nonfiction. The course features extensive nonfiction writing and revision, workshop discussion, and readings in major authors of literary nonfiction.

       

    • Prerequisites: One of the following courses: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2111, ENGL 2112, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2121, ENGL 2122, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2131, ENGL 2132, or ENGL 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3140 - Writing for the Workplace

    • This course emphasizes strategies for producing effective documents in a variety of professional contexts. Students gain practice with common workplace forms as they master writing clearly and with the needs and expectations of their audiences in mind. This course is particularly valuable to students preparing for careers in business, government, and nonprofit organizations.

       

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3150 - Topics in Digital Rhetoric

    • This course explores rhetorical practices in electronic environments and provides an examination of major works on digital reading, writing, and culture framed by contemporary rhetorical theories. Students plan, design, and compose a variety of rhetorically effective digital texts. This course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs from the previous offering.

       

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3160 - Argumentative Writing

    •  

      This course focuses on the study and practice of argumentative writing. It includes the study of current models of effective arguments and the process of forming written arguments. It features extensive writing and revision, workshop discussion, and readings of classical and contemporary arguments. The course can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

      Notes: These courses can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.

      Offered as an online course.

       

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 3170 - Environmental Writing and Literature

    • A course in writing ad reading about the environment, intended for students interested in major works of environmental literature and for those who wish to think and write about the interconnections between humans and the nonhuman world. The course studies pastoral literature, nature writing, and science writing, and provides instruction in the writing of environmental nonfiction prose for aesthetic, expressive, intellectual, and instrumental purposes. These courses can be taken more than once provided the course content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 4100 - Advanced Poetry Writing

    • Building on the skills learned in WRIT 3100, this course offers advanced workshop experiences for practiced writers of poetry and includes lecture and discussion of contemporary approaches to poetics and the work of contemporary poets. This workshop approach stresses development and integration of all technical and artistic elements of poetry writing.
    • Prerequisites: WRIT 3100
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 4110 - Advanced Playwriting

    • This advanced workshop stresses development and integration of all technical and artistic elements of playwriting. Some readings from the work of established writers are included.
    • Prerequisites: WRIT 3110
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 4120 - Advanced Fiction Writing

    • Building on the skills learned in WRIT 3120, this course offers advanced workshop experiences for practiced writers of fiction and includes lecture and discussion of contemporary approaches to fiction writing and the work of contemporary fiction writers. This workshop approach stresses development and integration of all technical and artistic elements of fiction writing.
    • Prerequisites: WRIT 3120.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • WRIT 4125 - Advanced Techniques in Fiction Writing

    • Advanced Techniques in Fiction Writing is a seminar-workshop that offers in-depth study of a topic in fiction writing. It builds on skills learned in WRIT 4120, but differs from this workshop in that it focuses on a particular topic rather than student-generated manuscripts. For example, students may study a specific author’s use of a technique or the use of a technique in a subgenre as a model for their own writing.
    • Prerequisites: WRIT 4120 or permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3